Find our best cash ISA rates

Earn interest tax free with our best cash ISA rates up to 5.09%

View the different types of cash ISA available and then compare our best ISA rates to find the right account for you.

Compare our best cash ISAs

See interest rates, terms and more when you compare cash ISA rates
ParagonAldermoreYorkshire Building SocietyLeeds Building SocietyMarcus by Goldman SachsNatWestSkiptonMoneyboxSagaHampshire Trust BankParagonAldermoreYorkshire Building SocietyLeeds Building SocietyMarcus by Goldman SachsNatWestSkiptonMoneyboxSagaHampshire Trust Bank
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Last updated
February 15, 2024

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Today's best cash ISA rates - last updated Feb 26 2024

Here are the highest interest rates for a range of cash ISAs available in the UK market. Be aware that the best ISAs with the highest interest rates may often be further down the comparison table. This list is updated daily.
Product typeAER
Instant Access Cash ISAs5.09%
Notice Cash ISAs5.10%
1 Year Fixed Cash ISAs5.02%
2 Year Fixed Cash ISAs5.00%
3 Year Fixed Cash ISAs4.37%

What is a cash ISA?

A cash ISA (Individual Savings Account) is a savings product with special tax benefits. ISAs were introduced more than 20 years ago by the government, with the goal of getting more people to save.

With a cash ISA, you can earn interest on your savings, but you don't have to pay any tax on the returns you make.

Any UK resident aged 16 or over can open a cash ISA. If your child is under 16, they can't open an adult ISA, you have to open a junior cash ISA for them instead.

Money held in cash ISAs[1]
£281billion
Due to higher interest rates, ISAs have a new lease of life and its £20,000 tax-free allowance is more attractive to savers who want to maximise their earned interest.

How to choose the best cash ISA

To choose the best cash ISA for your needs, you must consider what the money is for, when you think you might need it, and how much flexibility you want over access. These are some of the main factors to consider:

Interest rate

The higher your interest rate, the more money you will make on your savings. However, getting the very highest rate usually means locking your money away for longer or agreeing to give notice before making a withdrawal.

Withdrawal limit

Some accounts limit the number of withdrawals you can make each year or cut the interest rate if you access your cash too often. This can mean better returns on your savings, but only if you don’t need the money. Easy access ISAs pay less interest but allow you to withdraw whatever you need.

Term length

If you choose a fixed rate ISA, you’ll have a guaranteed interest rate for a set period. The rates on offer can vary widely, and often depend on how long you lock the money away, so it’s worth shopping around for the best deal.

Flexibility

Some accounts allow you to withdraw money you’ve saved in the same year, without it counting towards your ISA allowance. Other accounts say that money is part of your allowance even though you’ve both paid it in and taken it out in the same financial year.

Eligibility and access

Some providers save their best rates for existing customers, so check what your account providers offer. You should also check out how easy the account is to manage – for instance, is there an app and can you use it to add cash funds.

Minimum deposit

Plenty of ISAs will allow you to start saving from just £1, but some impose a higher minimum deposit. There are even regular saver accounts that will pay you higher interest if you commit to saving a certain amount each month.

Charges and penalties

If you have a fixed rate ISA and you want to withdraw your money before the term is up, you’ll probably face an interest penalty or charges. Equally, some providers will charge you exit fees if you transfer your ISA elsewhere. Check the small print before signing up.

Why should you get a cash ISA?

Cash ISAs are attractive to savers because you never pay tax on the interest you earn. However, everyone has a personal savings allowance from the government that entitles them to a certain amount of interest tax free. 

So, as non-ISA accounts tend to pay better interest than their ISA counterparts, a cash ISA is best for someone who is already paying tax on their savings interest or near the limit of the personal savings allowance.

If you are a basic rate taxpayer (20%), you can earn up to £1,000 in interest without paying tax, while higher taxpayers (40%) have an allowance of £500. This means that most people won't be paying tax on interest from normal savings accounts anyway. However, additional rate taxpayers don’t have a personal savings allowance at all.

Our best instant access cash ISA

Our editors picked this deal by weighing several factors for each product, including the interest rate, withdrawal conditions, minimum opening balance and more.

Card
Chip Clearbank - Cash ISA
Instant access
Term
4.75%
AER BBR tracker
£1
Open with
FSCS
Protection scheme
How we score our products
Expert verdict
4.8/5
Apply now
Salman Haqqi, our savings expert says..
"Chip Clearbank's cash ISA is another great option if you're just starting your savings journey. At 4.75% AER BBR tracker the interest rate is competitive and you can start saving with just £1. Being instant access, you can make a withdrawal whenever you need to, and because it's in ISA, any interest you earn won't count towards your personal savings allowance. "
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Start saving with just £1
  • Unlimited withdrawals
  • Won't impact your personal savings allowance
  • Cons
  • Only available on the mobile app
  • Account details
    No notice, penalty, or charge applies.
    Eligibility
    Maximum Age
    Unlimited
    Minimum Initial Deposit
    £1
    Permanent UK Resident

    Our best fixed-rate cash ISA

    Our editors picked this deal by weighing up factors such as the interest rate, term, withdrawal conditions, and minimum opening balance for each product.

    Card
    Aldermore 1 Year Fixed Rate Cash ISA
    1 year
    Term
    5%
    AER fixed
    £1,000
    Open with
    FSCS
    Protection scheme
    How we score our products
    Expert verdict
    4.8/5
    Apply now
    Salman Haqqi, our savings expert says..
    "Aldermore's 1 year fixed rate cash ISA is one to consider if you have a small lump sum to put away for a year. At 5% AER fixed the interest rate is fairly competitive - and because it's a fixed term, you'll lock in that rate for the whole year. But at the same time, you can't make any withdrawals during that year, so be sure you won't need access to that cash."
    Pros and cons
    Pros
  • Fixed interest rate
  • Any interest you earn is tax free
  • Cons
  • No withdrawals during the term
  • Account details
    Withdrawals and closure permitted subject to 90 days loss of interest penalty.
    Eligibility
    Maximum Age
    Unlimited
    Minimum Initial Deposit
    £1,000
    Permanent UK Resident

    Our best notice cash ISA

    Our editors picked this deal by weighing several factors such as the interest rate, withdrawal conditions, minimum opening balance and others for each product.

    Card
    Aldermore 30 Day Notice Cash ISA
    Notice
    Term
    4.5%
    AER variable
    £1,000
    Open with
    FSCS
    Protection scheme
    How we score our products
    Expert verdict
    4.8/5
    Apply now
    Lucinda O'Brien, our savings expert says..
    "Notice savings accounts are great if don't need to access your money immediately but still want the freedom to withdraw at a time that suits you. This account from Aldermore ticks both those boxes as you can withdraw the money, but you'll just need to wait 30 days until it's released from the account. Plus, you get the added bonus of tax-free saving as it's a cash ISA."
    Pros and cons
    Pros
  • Competitive interest rate
  • Interest you earn is tax free
  • Cons
  • Requires £1,000 to open
  • Account details
    Withdrawals and closure are subject to 30 days notice or 30 days loss of interest, if notice is not given.
    Eligibility
    Maximum Age
    Unlimited
    Minimum Initial Deposit
    £1,000
    Permanent UK Resident
    fscs-logo
    Is my money safe?
    The Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) guarantees that the first £85,000 you have saved with a UK-authorised bank or building society (or the first £170,000 for a joint account) will be safe even if the business goes bust.

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    Three things you need to know about cash ISAs

    A cash ISA works exactly the same way as a standard savings account - with three exceptions.

    • You can only generally pay into one cash ISA in any given financial year - although that doesn't have to be the same product as last year.

    • You can only pay in £20,000 per person each year - although you can transfer as much as you like from one ISA provider to another, as long as the account provider allows transfers in. This limit is the total you can invest in all different kinds of ISAs. So, if you have a cash ISA and a stocks and shares ISA, you will need to split the limit between them.

    • All the money you make in interest is tax free.

    Cash ISAs work on the tax year, not the calendar year – so your allowance resets on April 6, not January 1.”

    What are the different types of cash ISAs?

    Easy access cash ISAs

    Easy access cash ISAs

    These accounts let you withdraw and deposit money whenever you like without any penalties. Easy access ISAs typically have the lowest interest rates and are best for short-term or emergency savings.

    Notice cash ISA

    Notice cash ISA

    With a notice ISA, you will need to give notice to withdraw money from your account or you will be penalised via loss of interest or a charge. The notice period varies between accounts but could be up to 180 days. These accounts tend to pay better interest than easy-access ISAs.

    Fixed-rate cash ISA

    Fixed-rate cash ISA

    Fixed-rate ISAs give you a good interest rate in exchange for you keeping your money locked away for a specific length of time, usually between one and five years. Generally, the interest rates are higher the longer the term of the deal, but this isn’t always true so be sure to shop around.

    Lifetime cash ISA

    Lifetime cash ISA

    Lifetime ISAs are designed to help people under the age of 40 to save for their first home or towards retirement. The maximum annual deposit is £4,000 each year, to which the government adds a 25% bonus.

    Junior cash ISA

    Junior cash ISA

    Junior cash ISAs allow you to save for your child’s future, as long as he or she is under 18 and living in the UK. The money in the account can be withdrawn by the child once they reach 18 years of age.

    Regular saver cash ISA

    Regular saver cash ISA

    These accounts generally pay a higher rate of interest that’s fixed for a set period – say 12 months. To qualify, you must agree to pay in a certain amount each month, often between around £25 and £250.

    What are the different types of cash ISAs?

    Easy access cash ISAs

    Easy access cash ISAs

    These accounts let you withdraw and deposit money whenever you like without any penalties. Easy access ISAs typically have the lowest interest rates and are best for short-term or emergency savings.

    Notice cash ISA

    Notice cash ISA

    With a notice ISA, you will need to give notice to withdraw money from your account or you will be penalised via loss of interest or a charge. The notice period varies between accounts but could be up to 180 days. These accounts tend to pay better interest than easy-access ISAs.

    Fixed-rate cash ISA

    Fixed-rate cash ISA

    Fixed-rate ISAs give you a good interest rate in exchange for you keeping your money locked away for a specific length of time, usually between one and five years. Generally, the interest rates are higher the longer the term of the deal, but this isn’t always true so be sure to shop around.

    Lifetime cash ISA

    Lifetime cash ISA

    Lifetime ISAs are designed to help people under the age of 40 to save for their first home or towards retirement. The maximum annual deposit is £4,000 each year, to which the government adds a 25% bonus.

    Junior cash ISA

    Junior cash ISA

    Junior cash ISAs allow you to save for your child’s future, as long as he or she is under 18 and living in the UK. The money in the account can be withdrawn by the child once they reach 18 years of age.

    Regular saver cash ISA

    Regular saver cash ISA

    These accounts generally pay a higher rate of interest that’s fixed for a set period – say 12 months. To qualify, you must agree to pay in a certain amount each month, often between around £25 and £250.

    Pros and cons

    Pros

    Cash ISAs are tax free, so you get to keep all the interest you earn
    Many cash ISAs allow you to access your money for any reason
    Your money's protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), up to £85,000

    Cons

    You can only save up to your ISA allowance and into one cash ISA account per tax year
    You may not always be able to access your money instantly
    Even the best cash ISA interest rates are generally still lower than inflation

    What are the alternatives to a cash ISA?

    There are many alternatives to a cash ISA, but where to save for the best returns depends on what you want to do with your money and when you need access to it. Here are some of the main options:

    • Stocks and shares ISAs - these let you put money into shares and other investments without paying income tax or capital gains tax on the growth. Returns could be far higher than with a cash ISA, but the value of your money could also fall if your investments perform poorly. Stocks and shares ISAs are best for long-term savings, so you can ride out any volatility.

    • Standard savings accounts - you won't pay tax on the first £1,000 of interest you earn if you're a basic rate taxpayer, although this drops to £500 if you're a higher rate taxpayer and £0 if you’re an additional rate payer.

    • Fixed-rate bonds - these fixed-rate savings accounts allow you to invest a large sum for a fixed period for a guaranteed return. During the fixed period, you have no access to your funds, so they’re better for medium-term savings.

    • High-interest current accounts – some current accounts offer high rates of interest on positive balances. This can make them a good place to stash emergency savings you may need to access quickly.

    FAQs

    What is your best cash ISA interest rate?

    Our best cash ISA rate is currently 5.09%.

    Is my money safe in a cash ISA?

    Yes, your money is safe in a cash ISA as most are backed by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS, which protects your money up to £85,000 with a single institution).

    Can I take money out of a cash ISA and put it back in again?

    Whether you can take money out of a cash ISA and put it back in again depends on which kind of account and provider you choose. Some ISAs let you withdraw money and replace it during the same tax year without using up any more of your ISA allowance. Find out more here.

    Can I take my money out of my ISA whenever I want?

    You can take money out of your cash ISA whenever you want if it allows unlimited withdrawals. However, there may be restrictions on paying money back in. Find out more here.

    Can I pay into multiple ISAs?

    You can have as many ISAs as you want, but you can only pay into one cash, one stocks and shares, one innovative finance and one Lifetime ISA in each tax year. Your allowance can be split across all types of ISA. Find out more here

    What other types of ISA can I have?

    As well as a cash ISA, you can also pay into one of each of the other three types of ISA each year. So that's a stocks and shares ISA, Lifetime ISA – if you’re aged 18 to 50 – and innovative finance ISA. Your ISA allowance must be split between them though, so you can't pay in more than £20,000 a year in total.

    Can I have an ISA if I have bad credit?

    Yes, you can have an ISA if you have bad credit as your finances are not checked when you open a savings account. If you need help choosing the right savings account, read this guide.

    Can I pay into more than one cash ISA?

    You can only open or pay into one cash ISA a year, but your ISA allowance can be split across different types of ISA. You could therefore pay into a cash ISA, a stocks and shares ISA, an innovative finance ISA and a lifetime ISA in the same year – but you can’t put in more than £20,000 overall.

    Are the ISA rules changing in 2024?

    Yes. In the Autumn Statement 2023, Jeremy Hunt revealed that the rules around ISAs would change in April 2024.

    For example, the government plans to scrap the rule of only having one of each type of ISA and will allow people to have multiple subscriptions to the same type of ISA. Plus, the government will allow partial transfers of ISA funds between providers during the year.

    Learn more about savings accounts

    From how to choose the right savings account to understanding the tax-free benefits of ISAs, we've got you covered.
    What's the best place for your money?
    What's the best place for your money?
    What is a Help to Save account?
    What is a Help to Save account?
    Are cash ISAs still worth it?
    Are cash ISAs still worth it?

    About the author

    Lucinda O'Brien
    Lucinda O'Brien has spent the past 10 years writing and editing content for regional and national titles. She applies her industry knowledge to ensure readers can make confident financial decisions.

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    References

    1. Gov.uk annual savings statistics: HMRC statistics on Individual Savings Accounts 2023 (chart 3)