You can find one using this comparison, which includes every bank account in the UK that can be opened in joint names.

How do joint accounts work?

They are current accounts held by two or more people. Most joint accounts are held by couples, but you can open one with family or friends.

They can be convenient because you can use them for payments that everyone on the account is responsible for, such as your household bills if you live together.

For example, a couple or some housemates could pay money into the account each month and set up direct debits on the account to pay the mortgage, council tax and utility bills.

Who can access the money in the account?

Joint accounts usually let anyone named on it to make withdrawals at any time. Some banks let you restrict some transactions so they have to be authorised by both or all of you.

Here is how to decide who can make withdrawals and the risks of opening an account with someone else.

What are the requirements for a joint account?

Most can only be opened if you have a permanent address and live in the UK, and some accounts can only be opened if you are over 18.

Banks that offer overdrafts also run a credit check on all of you when you apply. If the bank think one person's credit record is unattractive, your application could be declined.

Which account should you choose?

Almost every bank account can be opened in joint names, so you could choose one that offers the specific features you need. Look for these by comparing:

Once you have compared accounts and found the best one, check that you can open it in joint names. You can then apply for it online through the bank or in a branch.

How to switch your joint bank account

You could move your joint account to a new bank using the Current Account Switch Service (CASS), which takes around seven days.

Your new account has to be held in the same names as the old one. This means if you have a joint account with your partner, it could only be switched to another joint account with them.

Joint bank accounts FAQs

Q

Can I get an overdraft on a joint account?

A

Yes, joint accounts can come with overdrafts as long as the bank are willing to offer one to all of you after running credit checks.

Q

Do I have to be married to get a joint account?

A

No, couples can take out a joint account whether they are married or not. You could also open an account with a friend or relative.

Q

Can we each have our own debit card?

A

Yes, if an account offers features like a debit card, cheque book or internet banking login, you will each get your own.

Q

Can we get a joint account if we live at different addresses?

A

Yes, most banks allow you to open a joint account with someone who does not live with you.

Q

Can I have my own separate bank account?

A

Yes, if you already have your own bank account or want to open one in your own name, you can have this as well as a joint account.

Q

Could we get a joint savings account?

A

Yes, savings accounts can also be opened in joint names. You can compare savings accounts here.

About our current accounts comparison

Q

Who do we include in this comparison?

A

We include every personal current account that can be opened in joint names in the UK, except for student and children's accounts. They are all regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). Here is more information about how our website works.

Q

How do we make money from our comparison?

A

We have commercial agreements with some of the companies in this comparison and get paid commission if we help you take out one of their products or services. Find out more here.

You do not pay any extra and the deal you get is not affected.